Reminiscence and Resource Centre

Nothing is too much trouble for Betty - 1948
How much more happy is the atmosphere in a department when it contains workers who are of a cheerful disposition! Ray of sunshine in Dept 324 is that always cheerful packer, Mrs Betty Carpenter, whose contentment seems to be infectious and spreads right through the department, although in the accompanying picture she looks far from happy. The other girls were chipping her and she was trying not to laugh. What is the secret of her happiness? Probably it is because she was married recently, and in her dreams is already living in that house, for which she prepares so busily in the evenings, or again it may be because she likes her work here so much. Betty came to East Tilbury in September, 1946, and went straight to Dept 324 as a packer, and there she has remained ever since.
This was not her first experience of that kind of work, however, for quite a number of years, 24 years old Betty worked as a packer in a neighbouring margarine factory, but now she infinitely prefers shoes and plimsolls to margarine. Before that again, Betty worked for a time as an assistant cook at a local hospital, but although she loves cooking, she found catering for a large number of people too much. Betty and her husband, who works in Purfleet at present live with her parents, but both are busily preparing for the day when they can get a house of their own. At the moment they are both making a rug, and they have many more plans as to what furniture they can make themselves. So, in the evening, after Betty has finished with the cooking and washing up, she settles down to getting on with the rug, or else to knit a pullover or cardigan. She only rarely goes to the pictures and does not like dancing at all. “Give me some knitting or mending to do, or something to occupy my ;ands, and I shall be happy,” she told Bata Record. Foreman Pat Rogers is very proud of having Betty working with him. “She was married recently, but I do hope she will stay on at work here,” confided Pat, “ she is a good worker for whom nothing is too much trouble, and everyone here would miss her cheerfulness.”
BETTY CARPENTER